Shipibo Traditional Tela

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Shipibo Traditional Tela

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Tribe: Shipibo This is a traditional Shipibo tela made with natural un-dyed cotton (grown and weaved themselves). The embroidery process can last up to three months. Woven by Lydia Fasanado Rio and then embroidered by her daughter in the traditional 'xao kene'...Read more

Tribe: Shipibo

This is a traditional Shipibo tela made with natural un-dyed cotton (grown and weaved themselves). The embroidery process can last up to three months. Woven by Lydia Fasanado Rio and then embroidered by her daughter in the traditional 'xao kene' designs.

The Shipibo are distinguished by their extensive knowledge of medicinal plants and their beautiful craftwork traditions in ceramics and textiles. Their textiles, which are also known as ‘telas’ are a central pillar of their culture and have been recognised by the Peruvian State as ‘Patrimonio Cultural de la Nación’ (National Cultural Heritage).

Size: 140cm (55") x 69cm (27.5").

The patterns woven into their telas are said to represent the geometric structures seen whilst working with Ayahuasca. The patterns are an ongoing dialogue or communion with the spiritual world and powers of the rainforest. Shipibo art interprets these paradigms and visions into a physical form. The ethnologist Angelika Gebhart-Sayer, calls this: “Visual Music”.

It is important to understand that these designs not only serve the purpose of ornamentation and decoration, they represent an entire communication system with plant spirits. As well as coming from the imagination of the individual, each piece is based on the collective consciousness of the whole Shipibo tribe.

The Tela project is organised and directly coordinated with the Shipibos with help and facilitation from the great team at Alianza ArkanaAll project members receive equal return from the sale of the art: 1/3 Shipibo x 1/3 Alianza Arkana x 1/3 Xapiri


The telas are all sourced from a community called Paoyan, which is located around four hours by fast boat downriver from Pucallpa, the capital of the region of Ucayali, Peru.  Paoyan with a population of approximately 800 people has a rich cultural tradition. Nearly all the women there make textiles as their sale is an important source of income for the families. Additionally, there are at least three older women who still weave the cotton fabric in the traditional way. This is a very time consuming and laborious process, involving growing the cotton, spinning it, then using a very basic loom to create tightly woven fabrics.

Sadly, this tradition of hand making the cotton fabric is in danger of dying as the younger women find it easier to buy the fabrics ready-made. One of the objectives of Alianza Arkana and Xapiri is to support the older women still carrying on this tradition by buying their work at a good, fair price, that recognises the skill and labor involved in their production, and then using some of the profits from the sale of this to set up training workshops in which the older women will teach the younger women.

A further key objective of our work with this community is to help provide an international market for the work of the women, so they are not forced to leave their families and eke out a precarious existence on the streets of large cities like Cuzco and Lima trying to sell their work at rock-bottom prices to tourists.

Fairness is hugely important in Shipibo culture. Healers who work with foreigners can all too often attract jealousy due to their income and the level of care for their family that these relationships can attract. In Poayan, there are few opportunities to earn an income due to its distance from the city. More and more families are being forced to migrate to Pucallpa to support a life that increasingly requires money. Projects such as this, will give the community members opportunity to earn money through their beautiful art while continuing traditional life in their village.