Art, Design & Tea

Art, Design & Tea
Design, indigenous identity and Amazonian tea!

17th July, 7pm, Xapiri - Calle Garcilaso 210, Cusco.

 

164 Women presentation by Angeles Ortiz x Cuyana

164 WOMEN is an installation designed by Ángeles Ortiz commissioned by Cuyana and handcrafted by the 164 women of the Maria Auxiliadora Association from the canton of Sigsig. The artist explores the indigenous cultural identity of the Toquilleras artisans located in South Ecuador, through the poetic and the abstract, giving her reading of their daily life and the sense that weaving has for the identity of these women. An impressive installation that exemplifies the incomparable level of dedication in the work with toquilla straw, a cultural practice in the UNESCO list of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The installation was exhibited in the month of July in San Francisco during the Design Week.

Ángeles Ortiz - Designer and Curator

Ángeles in an Ecuadorian product designer and researcher. Her work is meticulous and shows an insightful connection with culture, human behavior and the arts. In 2015 Angeles was awarded a grant to work in FABRICA’S design department, known globally as Benetton’s communication research center. Since then her work has been exhibited at the Milan Design Week and Design Miami / Basel and SF Design Week. Angeles pieces have been described by critics as harmonious for their fascinating balance between formal design and the influences of local Ecuadorian crafts. www.angelesortiz.com

 

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Náha tea ceremony by Melanie Dizon

The Amazon rainforest is home to an abundance of native plants and trees whose purpose is to support the health and wealth of the natural world. Creatures big and small thrive from the ecosystems that the plant world provides. We as humans have relied on that same nature to gift us with its salubrious intelligence, creating an alliance between medicine and morality, resource and reciprocity, and a more vibrant human connection.

Náha means nest in the language of the Amahuaca; an indigenous peoples of the southeastern Amazon Basin of Peru and Brazil. The region of Madre de Dios is a confluence of cultures and traditional practices from where we draw our inspiration. We believe in the power of storytelling and the exchange of knowledge as a means of cultural perpetuity.

The act of drinking tea is a return to the art of stillness, distilling the essence of nature into the very nature of ourselves; activating the intuitive, awakening the innate, and balancing our internal ecosystem. A majority of our medicinal teas are harvested from plants growing in the rainforest wilderness. The plants are our allies, and the forest the home that we steward.

 

Photos from the evening:

Ángeles Ortiz Xapiri
Ángeles Ortiz Xapiri164 Women presentation by Angeles Ortiz x Cuyana164 Women presentation by Angeles Ortiz x Cuyana164 Women presentation by Angeles Ortiz x CuyanaNáha tea ceremony in Xapiri by Melanie DizonNáha tea ceremony in Xapiri by Melanie DizonNáha tea ceremony in Xapiri by Melanie DizonNáha tea ceremony in Xapiri by Melanie DizonNáha tea ceremony in Xapiri by Melanie Dizon